Resources

Women Startup and Funding Info

37 Angels: 37 Angels activates the untapped capital and experience women can bring to investing in male and female-led ventures.

500 Women:  Funding Flawless Female Founders

Astia:  Network that offers access to capital and training/support for women entrepreneurs

Cartier Women’s Initiative:  International business plan competition for women entrepreneurs

Digital Undivided:  Programming focused on Black and Latino women founding tech companies

Double Digit Academy:  Training & workshops for women looking to raise venture capital

FastTrac NewVenture:  Workshops that helps women turn their business idea into reality

Golden Seeds:  Angel investor network and fund investing in women entrepreneurs

In Good Company:  Co-working space for women entrepreneurs

Lioness:  Digital magazine for female entrepreneurs

Own It Ventures:  Meet and market to Angel Investors, the Media, Retailers and Consumers

Pipeline Fellowship:  Women investors investing in women led social enterprises

Refinery:  Transforming women led startups into scaleable businesses

Springboard Enterprises:  Accelerator for women-led growth companies

WBENC:  Get certified (as >51% women owned) and have access to business opportunities

Women 2.0:  Content, community and conferences for women innovators in tech

Women’s Venture Capital Fund: Capitalizes on the expanding pipeline of women entrepreneurs leading gender diverse teams and creating capital efficient, high growth companies in digital media and sustainable products and services

Women’s Venture Fund:  Helps entrepreneurs through courses, counseling, credit and more

Facts and Stats

  • About 7% of investor money goes to women-led startups.
  • Women comprise only 11% of partners at venture capital firms and about 13% of angel investors.
  • Between 1997 and 2014, the number of women-owned businesses in the U.S. rose by 68%, twice the growth rate for men and nearly one and a-half times the rate for all companies.
  • Women are starting approximately 1,288 companies each day, up from 602 in 2011-2012.
  • 11% of Silicon Valley executives are women.
  • In Silicon Valley 10% of directors are women and makeup 10% of committee members and 8% of committee chairs — which is 50% less than in the S&P 100.
  • 9% of women are named executive officers in both the Silicon Valley 150 and the S&P 100.

Organizations and Blogs

Black Girls Code: Provides  young and pre-teen girls of color opportunities to learn in-demand skills in technology and computer programming.

BlogHer: In 2005 Elisa Camahort, Jory Des Jardins, and Lisa Stone responded to the often repeated question: “where all the women bloghers?”  Blogher was their answer, the largest online community of women bloghers to date.

Anita Borg Institute: This inspiring organization works to increase the impact of women on all aspects of technology, and increase the positive impact of technology on the world’s women.

Feminist Approach to Technology: A not-for-profit organization based in New Delhi working towards empowering women through technology.

Girl Develop IT: An organization, certified by the Board of Education, that exists to provide affordable and accessible programs to women who want to learn how to code.

Geek Girl Blogs: A great blogging community for women working in IT.

Girls Who Code: A national nonprofit organization working to close the gender gap in the technology and engineering sectors.

Linuxchix: Great network of women working in Linux.

NCWIT: The National Center for Women & Information Technology is a coalition of over 200 prominent corporations, academic
institutions, government agencies, and non-profits working to increase women’s participation in information technology (IT).

National Women of Color Technology Conference: The conference recognizes the significant accomplishments of minority women in the digital world, and attracts and leverages talent in innovative, professional, and technical positions.

NTEN: A member driven organization that aspires to a world where all nonprofit organizations skillfully and confidently use technology to meet community needs and fulfill their missions. It’s lead by Women Who Tech advisory committee member Holly Ross.

Women2.0:  A SF bay area organization that aims to increase the number of young women entrepreneurs by encouraging women to work with and in the field of technology.

WebChick.net: Angela Byron’s blog about working in open source.

Systers: One of the world’s largest email communities of technical women in computing.

The Kauffman Foundation: Provides grant making on two areas — educational achievement and entrepreneurial success. They have great studies on the positive impact women CEO’s have on companies.